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Black-Eyed Susan Vs. Sunflower A Comparison of Two Summer Flowers

Black Eyed Susan Vs. Sunflower a Comparison of Two Summer Flowers

black eyed susan vs sunflower

Black-Eyed Susan vs Sunflower

Black-Eyed Susan vs Sunflower

Black-eyed Susans and sunflowers are both popular garden flowers, but there are some key differences between the two plants.

Black-eyed Susans are perennial plants that grow in USDA zones 3-9. They typically bloom in the summer and fall, and their flowers can range in color from yellow to orange to red. Sunflowers are also perennial plants that grow in USDA zones 3-11. They typically bloom in the summer, and their flowers can range in color from yellow to orange to red.

So, which plant is better? It depends on what you’re looking for. If you’re looking for a plant that is drought-tolerant and blooms for a long period of time, then black eyed susans are a good choice. If you’re looking for a plant that is tall and produces large flowers, then sunflowers are a good choice.

Feature Black-eyed Susan Sunflower
Scientific name Rudbeckia hirta Helianthus annuus
Family Asteraceae Asteraceae
Genus Rudbeckia Helianthus
Species hirta annuus

black eyed susan vs sunflower

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II. Black-Eyed Susan vs Sunflower: Key Differences

Black-eyed susans and sunflowers are both members of the daisy family, but there are some key differences between the two plants.

Size: Black-eyed susans are typically shorter than sunflowers, reaching heights of 2-3 feet. Sunflowers, on the other hand, can grow to be much taller, reaching heights of up to 10 feet.

Flowers: The flowers of black-eyed susans are typically smaller than those of sunflowers. Black-eyed susans have a single daisy-like flower with a yellow center and dark brown or purple petals. Sunflowers have large, showy flowers with a yellow center and brown or black petals.

Bloom time: Black-eyed susans bloom in the summer and fall, while sunflowers bloom in the summer.

Hardiness: Black-eyed susans are hardy in USDA zones 3-9, while sunflowers are hardy in USDA zones 3-11.

Drought tolerance: Black-eyed susans are drought-tolerant plants, while sunflowers are not as drought-tolerant.

Attraction to pollinators: Black-eyed susans are attractive to a variety of pollinators, including bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds. Sunflowers are also attractive to pollinators, but they are especially attractive to bees.

III. Black-Eyed Susan: Appearance and Care

Black-eyed susans are perennial plants that grow in USDA zones 3-9. They typically reach a height of 2-3 feet and have a spread of 2-4 feet. The leaves are lance-shaped and green, and the flowers are daisy-like with a yellow center and black petals. Black-eyed susans are drought-tolerant and easy to care for. They prefer full sun and well-drained soil. They can be propagated by seed or division.

black eyed susan vs sunflower

IV. Sunflower: Appearance and Care

Sunflowers are tall, upright plants with large, daisy-like flowers.

The flowers can range in size from 3 to 12 inches in diameter, and they typically bloom in the summer..

The petals of the sunflower flower are yellow, and the center of the flower is brown. Sunflowers are easy to grow, and they are drought-tolerant. They can be grown in full sun or partial shade, and they prefer well-drained soil. Sunflowers are also a good choice for pollinator gardens, as they attract bees and butterflies.

black eyed susan vs sunflower

V. Black-Eyed Susan: Varieties

There are many different varieties of black-eyed susans, each with its own unique characteristics. Some of the most popular varieties include:

Rudbeckia fulgida ‘Goldsturm’ is a tall, upright variety that produces large, golden yellow flowers. It is drought-tolerant and easy to care for.
Rudbeckia fulgida ‘Goldsturm Double’ is a double-flowered variety of R. fulgida ‘Goldsturm’. It produces larger flowers than the single-flowered variety.
Rudbeckia hirta ‘Prairie Sun’ is a short, spreading variety that produces bright yellow flowers. It is a good choice for gardens with limited space.
Rudbeckia hirta ‘Goldilocks’ is a variegated variety of R. hirta ‘Prairie Sun’. It has yellow flowers with a white center.
Rudbeckia triloba ‘Little Gold’ is a small, compact variety that produces bright yellow flowers. It is a good choice for rock gardens or containers.

These are just a few of the many different varieties of black-eyed susans available. By choosing the right variety for your garden, you can enjoy beautiful blooms for many years to come.

black eyed susan vs sunflower

I. Introduction

Black-eyed Susans and sunflowers are two popular garden flowers that are often confused with each other. Both plants are members of the daisy family and produce large, showy flowers. However, there are some key differences between the two plants.

Black-eyed Susans are native to North America, while sunflowers are native to the Americas. Black-eyed Susans are perennials, meaning they come back year after year, while sunflowers are annuals, meaning they only live for one year. Black-eyed Susans typically bloom in the summer and fall, while sunflowers bloom in the summer.

Black-eyed Susans are drought-tolerant plants, while sunflowers need regular watering. Black-eyed Susans are also more tolerant of heat and humidity than sunflowers.

In terms of appearance, black-eyed Susans have yellow petals with a dark brown center, while sunflowers have yellow petals with a dark brown center. Black-eyed Susans are typically smaller than sunflowers, with a height of 2-3 feet. Sunflowers can grow up to 10 feet tall.

Both black-eyed Susans and sunflowers are attractive plants that can add color and interest to any garden. However, it is important to choose the right plant for your climate and growing conditions.

IX. Black-Eyed Susan: Pollination

Black-eyed susans are pollinated by a variety of insects, including bees, butterflies, and moths. The flowers produce nectar, which attracts these insects. The insects then help to pollinate the flowers by transferring pollen from the male anthers to the female stigma. This helps to produce seeds, which are then dispersed by the wind.

Sunflower: Bloom Time

Sunflowers typically bloom in the summer, from June to August. The exact timing of the bloom depends on the variety of sunflower and the climate. Some varieties of sunflowers bloom earlier in the season, while others bloom later. Sunflowers are also heat-tolerant plants, so they can tolerate hot weather and still produce flowers.

IX. Black-Eyed Susan: Pollination

Black-eyed susans are pollinated by a variety of insects, including bees, butterflies, and moths. The flowers produce nectar, which attracts these insects. The insects then help to pollinate the flowers by transferring pollen from the male anthers to the female stigma.

Black-eyed susans are also self-pollinating, meaning that they can produce seeds without the help of insects. This is because the flowers have both male and female parts. However, cross-pollination, which occurs when pollen from one flower is transferred to another flower, can produce more seeds and stronger plants.

Black-eyed susans are a good choice for gardens that are designed to attract pollinators. They are also a good choice for gardens that are located in areas that are not conducive to insect activity, such as urban areas.

XI. FAQ

Q: What are the key differences between black-eyed susans and sunflowers?

A: Black-eyed susans and sunflowers are both members of the daisy family, but there are some key differences between the two plants.

Black-eyed susans are perennial plants that grow in USDA zones 3-9, while sunflowers are annual plants that grow in USDA zones 3-11..

Black-eyed susans typically bloom in the summer and fall, while sunflowers typically bloom in the summer. Black-eyed susans have flowers that range in color from yellow to orange to red, while sunflowers have flowers that are typically yellow.

Q: Which plant is better for my garden?

A: The best plant for your garden depends on your individual needs and preferences. If you are looking for a plant that is drought-tolerant and blooms for a long period of time, then black-eyed susans are a good choice. If you are looking for a plant that is tall and produces large flowers, then sunflowers are a good choice.

Q: How do I care for black-eyed susans and sunflowers?

Black-eyed susans and sunflowers are both relatively easy to care for. They both require full sun and well-drained soil. Black-eyed susans are drought-tolerant, but sunflowers need regular watering. Both plants can be propagated by seed or division.

Katie Owen
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